the gift of the “impossible”

“It may be that we have lost our ability to hold a blazing coal, to move unfettered through time, to walk on water, because we have been taught that such things have to be earned; we should deserve them; we must be qualified. We are suspicious of grace. We are afraid of the lavishness of the gift.
But a child rejoices in presents!”

(page 77)

“Am I suggesting that we really ought to be able to walk upon water? That there are (and not just in fantasies) easier and faster ways to travel than by jet or car? Yes, I am. There are too many stories of mystics being able to move hundreds of miles through the power of contemplation for us to be able to toss them aside. Over and over again throughout the centuries we have made choices which were meant to free us, but which ultimately have limited and restricted us. But the artist has retained some of the freedom we have lost in the industrial dailiness of our living.”

(page 94)

Walking on Water: Reflections of Faith and Art

by Madeleine L’ Engle

God has VIEW.

Merrily reading “Walking on Water: Reflections of Faith and Art” by Madeleine L’ Engle today, drinking up creative writing juices as I continue to work on writing my book, I drifted upon this brilliant sentence:

“I have a point of view.

You have a point of view.

But God has view.”

(page 179)

to love without judgment

A French priest, conducting a retreat, said,

To love anyone is to hope in him always.


From the moment at which we begin to judge anyone,


to limit our confidence in him,


from the moment at which we identify (pigeonhole) him,

and so reduce him to that,


we cease to love him, and he ceases to be able to become better.


We must dare to love in a world that does not know how to love.

(Walking on Water by Madeleine L’ Engle, page 127)

My friend Caitlin’s video from the streets of New York City: