Sex Trafficking: Experiencing Restoration, but Still Running

My very smart sister is getting a Masters degree in Social Work. She’s very passionate and learned about sex trafficking. Plus, she spent three months in India working in a restoration house for rescued women. I continuously learn and receive inspiration from her.

She appreciated this article and thus, I thought it ought to be shared here. It’s a good reminder that fixing a circumstance doesn’t necessarily heal the heart issues. This is the same with individuals as it is with nations etc. For example, the toppling of a dictatorial government does not bring a nation into instant health and wholeness. There is still inner healing needed. Much of one’s inclination to run, to return to old ways, and to rebel against kindness is in one’s broken sense of identity. When true identity and value is felt, actions and perspectives will shift too.

What do you think about this?

 

Embracing the Pain of Losing a Child | Christa Black

The experience shared in this article is awful. The idea of losing a child is horrific. Yet, I am amazed by the sincerity; vulnerability; comfort; and ultimately, the awareness of God’s love and presence that remains in the midst of it.

If you know someone who has lost a child, please share this with them. Blessings of peace and the comfort of the Holy Spirit to all who read it.

Embracing the Pain of Losing a Child | Christa Black.

 

Embracing the Pain of Losing a Child | Christa Black

Middle East Mondays: You must learn in both directions

I saw an article recently about a Palestinian professor who took a group of Palestinian students to visit Auschwitz. The critical uproar against his actions was very saddening. I thought back to about five years ago when I took a Palestinian friend to see a musical about the history of the Jews. When it came to the bit about the Holocaust, she was horrified! “HOW many people died?!” she asked me. When I answered, “Around eleven million,” she was completely and utterly stunned. “I thought it was like six hundred!” she said. She instantly saw that she had been presented a false reality, a biased report, a lie. She clearly felt uneasy and, likely, a bit gross. Her eyes widened as she further thought about how inhumane it was for people to minimize such an event – moreover, for the purpose of fueling a continued resentment, an “us vs them” mentality, and an international dispute. She was also wondering what else had been presented wrongly to her for the point of keeping Palestinians hostile against their Jewish neighbors.

Granted, a big and beautiful difference in this story, is that my friend is a Christian. She was once a Muslim, but met Jesus and chose to follow Him. In fact, she already loved the Jews. She was still working through some of her past perspectives, but she genuinely loved them. This helped her respond to these newfound facts with sincerity, compassion, and a desire to help heal the wounds between Palestinians and Jews.

Her heart toward healing is a key toward healing in the Middle East. Likewise, the compassion the professor in the article displayed, is also key. Compassion and hearing one another will do more than a peace treaty, a summit, or thousands of books on that matter. Certainly, those tools can be powerful if they involve the spread of compassion, but on their own, they fall short. Love will heal nations. I applaud this professor for leading such healing.

 

 

palestinian prof at auschwitz